On the Trail with Ty: 10/31/18 Halloween

Halloween reminds us that fun and laughter is essential. I dressed up as Manny Ramirez at a Halloween Party for children at the Willett School on Sunday. I wore a Manny Ramirez wig, my baseball cap and a genuine Red Sox Manny uniform. It was a blast!
The race for city councilor feels extremely close. This is due to a close race in signs, my perception that many people like my message for children, excellent education and caring about seniors. A number of people are delighted I’m appearing at their door. My name recognition is fairly good. We are in for a tight race.
I don’t know who is reading this but I am making a plea to anyone who wants me in office.
Please reach out to TWO PEOPLE that haven’t yet made up their mind, urging them to vote for me. You may think this is unnecessary, to the contrary, it is critically important.
When I was in my mid-20’s I voted for a U.S. Senator candidate in New Hampshire. The vote turned out to be a dead tie. NH could not determine the winner in an age of paper ballots. The ballots finally were sent to the US Supreme Court for a final result. The Supreme Court could not make a decision and called the vote a tie.
One year after the original vote in 1974 another election was held in October, 1975 to determine the final victor. This time, John Durkin was elected to the United States Senate.
So let’s imagine the Attleboro vote for city council is a dead tie. If you speak to two people over the weekend and ask them to vote for me that could be crucial. If 20 people are reading this message that could produce 40 additional votes.
Perhaps I appear greedy and too competitive. I’ve given my life to this campaign since mid-June. I believe I can be helpful for children and seniors if I am elected to the Council. The two votes you can potentially send my way could make all the difference.
Meanwhile, I will knock on doors at least five hours a day through Monday. But I need your help.
THANK YOU!!!
Your candidate,
Ty Waterman

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On the Trail with Ty: 10/27/18

1. This was a whirlwind of a week!  I was invited to a Halloween party for children, sponsored by Attleboro’s Youth Commission. It was fun watching small children playing games, politely lining up to receive candy from the city councilors, and having a good old fashioned Halloween. Kudos to our Youth Commission!
2. The highlight of my week was the City Council/State Representative debate at city hall. Once more, I was proud to live in Attleboro as we discussed local issues. The most important question concerned respect for our mayor, our city councilors, and one another. I absolutely respect the efforts of Mayor Heroux and each of our councilors. We don’t have to agree when debating issues but we darn well need to be courteous and polite. I applaud anyone who tries to create a better world, a better Attleboro. Civility is essential in our society.
3. As your city councilor I pledge to listen to your concerns, questions, and views. I will try to help seniors with their property taxes, children with their schooling, and constituents who contact me with their personal concerns. i will listen to you.
4. I spent several hours last week at gatherings with John Davis and Nick Lavoie, who are running for City Council. John and Nick are fine gentlemen. They truly care about Attleboro and both of them would be excellent city councilors. Attleboro will be well served if you vote for either of these men.
5. Today I dressed up in a wig with a Manny Ramirez Red Sox’ uniform. We held signs and waved at cars passing through County Square for a couple of hours. Cars were honking and people were smiling and laughing as they passed us. A good time for everyone.
6. During this final week of the campaign I will be knocking at doors until sunset on Monday, November 5th. I will also be speaking this Tuesday at 11 am on the Paul Healy show on WARA. Please call the radio station if you have any questions or want to share your thoughts.
7. If you decide to vote for me, I will give you my best effort. I look forward to being your public servant.

On the Trail with Ty: 9/17/18

1.This is the week my beloved Red Sox will clinch the Eastern Division vs. the Yankees. How fitting that my first experience today in Ward 5A (off South Main St.) was about baseball? As we were inserting a pair of signs at the corner of Mulberry and Lafayette St., a man walked by and told me he enjoyed my book about the 1918 Red Sox. His then 15 year old daughter had given my book to him almost 20 years ago. I signed the book for Steve last year at the Attleboro Community Theatre.
We ended up talking about some of the players of that long ago deadball era. This wasn’t Attleboro politics but it resulted in my putting a sign in Steve’s yard. Great way to start the day.
2. Jose and I met in front of his barn on Pine Street and had a conversation about the Attleboro dump. Jose pays his taxes, which takes care of his weekly trash. Jose feels the dump should remain free. He loves Attleboro. Originally from Portugal, Jose wants his grandchildren to be fluent in both English and his native language. Jose thinks our schools should be teaching several foreign languages at a younger age, instead of simply offering Spanish in High School.
3. Sara on Dunham Street introduced me to Brent, her nine year old son. Brent can hear the teachers better than in the open class he had in fourth grade. He loves doing math. Sarah (Mom) and Brent are delighted he finally has a classroom with real walls.
4. While biking up Park Street towards Sturdy Hospital, I had the good fortune to meet Brenda, who suddenly appeared at her front door. She has a strong feeling for the homeless of our city. Brenda hopes we eventually have a family homeless shelter so struggling families can have a sense of security and warmth. Brenda actually grew up in a shelter on the North Shore of Mass. She wonders if Attleboro residents realize we do have a homeless population. As I left, she mused, “I will suffer for our homeless till the day I die.”
5. While heading back to my car, I stopped my bike in front of a quiet house on Parker Street. I heard a voice from the leafy front steps. It was a middle aged woman bemoaning the fate of her 62 year old sister, who was in the house suffering from Alzheimer’s.  I suggested she speak to one of our social workers at the Larson Senior Center. She sighed again. Her sister wasn’t well and didn’t seem to be trying to help herself. She thanked me for stopping and listening. Wish I could have done more.
6. My last visit was to a past supporter on School Street. This senior lady wants the council and our mayor to get along better. She wants city leaders to be civil and respectful of each other. She wants leadership that does something positive. I was a little surprised when she looked me in the eye, and told me to put up my sign in her yard. Then she asked me to contact Jim Hawkins and put one of his signs up, too. I would be honored to serve her. She’s a tough cookie and a really good soul.
All in all, it was a good day in the heart of Attleboro. Ward 5A is our smallest precinct but a vibrant one.
                                       Keep your chin up.
                                                               Ty

On the Trail with Ty: 8/28/18

I had a phone call from the Attleboro Sun Chronicle yesterday while knocking on doors. A reporter, Jim Hand, asked me about the book I wrote, “The Year The Red Sox Won the Series.” It was the Boston Globe book of the year back in 1999, telling the story of the world champion 1918 Boston Red Sox. Babe Ruth starred on that team, winning two games against the Chicago Cubs as a pitcher in the 1918 World Series.

I am flattered that the paper wants to run a story, replete with old photos, of my only published book, in this 100th anniversary of those 1918 champion Red Sox. It will be featured in a Saturday Sun Chronicle paper, probably on September 1 or 8.

Baseball has been a big part of my life. My dad was a professional baseball player, I played on a little league team, high school team, and American Legion ball as an outfielder. Baseball has been one of the driving forces of my life, including many years as a Red Sox and Paw Sox fan. I don’t talk about sports on my election journey through Attleboro. However, I do believe school sports can shape a young person’s life. Coaches become role models who make a strong imprint upon a youth.  Winning is nice but isn’t the most important thing. Developing the character of our youth should be number one in Attleboro’s sports programs.

I am heading out on my bike to Ward 3B Tuesday afternoon. Maybe playing ball through my teenage summers fortified me for a hot day like this. I learned to play under extreme mid-summer heat and maintain my concentration on each pitch. Or maybe I just love Attleboro and the people within it so much that I’m able to persevere through the heat and humidity. You decide.

51HFGJWRMVL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_The Year The Red Sox Won The Series: A Chronicle of the 1918 Championship Season
by Ty Waterman & Mel Springer
Link: http://a.co/d/gYorJ9p