On the Trail with Ty: 9/17/18

1.This is the week my beloved Red Sox will clinch the Eastern Division vs. the Yankees. How fitting that my first experience today in Ward 5A (off South Main St.) was about baseball? As we were inserting a pair of signs at the corner of Mulberry and Lafayette St., a man walked by and told me he enjoyed my book about the 1918 Red Sox. His then 15 year old daughter had given my book to him almost 20 years ago. I signed the book for Steve last year at the Attleboro Community Theatre.
We ended up talking about some of the players of that long ago deadball era. This wasn’t Attleboro politics but it resulted in my putting a sign in Steve’s yard. Great way to start the day.
2. Jose and I met in front of his barn on Pine Street and had a conversation about the Attleboro dump. Jose pays his taxes, which takes care of his weekly trash. Jose feels the dump should remain free. He loves Attleboro. Originally from Portugal, Jose wants his grandchildren to be fluent in both English and his native language. Jose thinks our schools should be teaching several foreign languages at a younger age, instead of simply offering Spanish in High School.
3. Sara on Dunham Street introduced me to Brent, her nine year old son. Brent can hear the teachers better than in the open class he had in fourth grade. He loves doing math. Sarah (Mom) and Brent are delighted he finally has a classroom with real walls.
4. While biking up Park Street towards Sturdy Hospital, I had the good fortune to meet Brenda, who suddenly appeared at her front door. She has a strong feeling for the homeless of our city. Brenda hopes we eventually have a family homeless shelter so struggling families can have a sense of security and warmth. Brenda actually grew up in a shelter on the North Shore of Mass. She wonders if Attleboro residents realize we do have a homeless population. As I left, she mused, “I will suffer for our homeless till the day I die.”
5. While heading back to my car, I stopped my bike in front of a quiet house on Parker Street. I heard a voice from the leafy front steps. It was a middle aged woman bemoaning the fate of her 62 year old sister, who was in the house suffering from Alzheimer’s.  I suggested she speak to one of our social workers at the Larson Senior Center. She sighed again. Her sister wasn’t well and didn’t seem to be trying to help herself. She thanked me for stopping and listening. Wish I could have done more.
6. My last visit was to a past supporter on School Street. This senior lady wants the council and our mayor to get along better. She wants city leaders to be civil and respectful of each other. She wants leadership that does something positive. I was a little surprised when she looked me in the eye, and told me to put up my sign in her yard. Then she asked me to contact Jim Hawkins and put one of his signs up, too. I would be honored to serve her. She’s a tough cookie and a really good soul.
All in all, it was a good day in the heart of Attleboro. Ward 5A is our smallest precinct but a vibrant one.
                                       Keep your chin up.
                                                               Ty
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On the Trail with Ty: 9/15/18 & 9/16/18

The highlight this weekend was two fold.
Saturday morning we held signs from 10 am – 12 pm at the entrance to Stop and Shop & Pleasant Street. There was a lot of traffic, a lot of waves from neighbors, a lot of thumbs up, and at least a dozen cars honked for us! My team is doing a great job promoting the campaign and getting my name recognized.
The last 30 minutes the volunteers and I played a game. Would men or women wave or honk more? The rules? One point for a wave, two points for a honk. Believe it or not, men beat the woman with 36 points to 33 points! The men were more likely to honk for 2 points.
Next Saturday morning we are holding signs at County Square. We could use your help! If you want to volunteers some Saturday mornings, call Jan Waterman at 508-455-1918. Holding signs and waving can be fun and really helps the campaign.
I biked to Ward 5A, just south of the center, on Saturday afternoon. I covered Maple, Mulberry, and Carpenter Streets. I met lots of nice people. I found Manuel in back of his home, watering his garden. Manuel is 72 years old. He spends a lot of time tending to his vegetable garden. I told Manuel I wanted to help seniors get a property tax break, he signed my nomination papers and introduced me to his girlfriend who also signed. He also took five palm cards to show to five of his seven adult children who also live in Attleboro. He had already shown me so much kindness but concluded by asking for two of my signs to tie onto his fence. What a nice man! Manuel is the salt of the earth.

On the Trail with Ty: 9/12/18

Today I biked the length of Pleasant Street on the 4A side of the street. Several Pleasant Street residents pointed out the big potholes and numerous cracks in the state highway section of Pleasant Street, out to the Norton town line. Nobody could remember when the state last fixed the this section of Pleasant Street. Attleboro has done all of the city’s section.

I am going to reach out to State Representative Jim Hawkins and make sure he is aware.

People really care about their street, their home, their Attleboro.

On the trail with Ty: 9/8/18

This campaign sometimes feels like a battle of signs. We have about 180 signs up. My opponents have lots of signs too.
The last two days have been exceptional with 11 homeowners requesting signs in wards 2 and 3. Each one of those signs represents a wonderful conversation with that homeowner.
Today, along North Main Street, I met a lady, her 18 year old daughter, and her daughters best friend. We talked about the large increase in Attleboro High School classes over the past few years. We talked about the need for a civics class at AHS. We talked about the new voting procedure in the state of Maine. We talked about college and the young women’s goals of becoming a social worker and an engineer. We talked about protesting when our schools lose good teachers through budget cuts. We talked about homeless folks in Attleboro and the need for a family shelter.
Each sign has a story behind it. This North Main Street sign represents a proud mother, a daughter determined to make this a better world, and a friend who wants to be a good engineer. This sign represents two young women that are proud to be voting for the first time, who care about Attleboro’s schools, and who want to make this world a better place.
Each sign tells an important story.

On The Trail with Ty: 9/6/18

Today ended early with a big thunderstorm at 5 pm. I was on Kellcourt Ave. speaking with Joe about his family, neighbors, and friends. He loves his area and really likes Attleboro. Joe moved into his home in 1992 and according to him, it was one of the best decision he’s ever made. Block parties, a friendly neighborhood, and a great place to raise his family. I liked Joe instantly. He signed my nomination papers, asked for a sign, and then the rain hit us.

A few hours earlier, I met a young woman on Commerce Way who simply glowed. Emily is a senior at Bridgewater State College and plans to be an elementary school teacher next fall. She did her student teaching in Attleboro during her junior year and loved it. The only drawback was the size of the classes which really surprised her. Regardless, Emily wants to come back to Attleboro and spend her career teaching in her hometown. When I left her door, her eyes sparkled again, she smiled and declared, “I love Attleboro!”

Lots of positivity in both Joe and Emily. I can’t wait to meet the rest of this city!

Please join us Saturday 9/8 from 10am-12pm as we hold signs downtown. Help us #TyAttleboroTogether!!!

On the Trail with Ty: 8/31/18

It was a beautiful day on my bike today, heading into neighborhoods off North Main Street (3B). My first visit was with a lawyer who is a partner in a local firm. He listened to my vision for lower class sizes, restoration of foreign languages in middle schools, and reaching out to seniors in their 90’s, including a few remaining WW2 vets as we support the mission of our Senior Center. We talked about listening to one another in the city council and city government. We realized we each have some wisdom and good ideas to impart. We talked about reaching across party lines and celebrating our seniors, veterans, teachers, school children, and health care providers.  We talked about Highland Country Club and a healthy environment in Attleboro. We talked about affordable housing for all, beds for the homeless, and help for those afflicted by addictions. We talked about our dreams for Attleboro.
Yes, dreams are important. Without our dreams, we will never achieve them. I am a dreamer and a problem solver.

When I left his home he thanked me for stopping by and spending a few minutes. I thanked him as well. We really connected and listened to each other.

Yes, it was a beautiful day in our neighborhood. I topped it off by listening to Peter, Paul, and Mary on PBS tonight. Life is good!
It is also Jax’s birthday, who sends “On the Trail With Ty” to you. Happy Birthday, Jax!
Peace, Ty
PS: Ty’s team will be holding signs next Saturday, Sept. 8th, in downtown Attleboro. If anybody would like to join us, anytime between 10 AM to noon, please call Jan Waterman at 508-455-1918. Leave a message and she will return your call. We would love to meet you. Have a wonderful Labor Day weekend!

It feels good to be back in Attleboro

Jan and I had a wonderfully relaxing vacation camping near the ocean in the Acadia region of Maine. After 8 days to recharge our batteries, I went out today along Holden and North Main Streets in Ward 3B.
I met a lawyer, policeman, construction foreman and a retired World War 2 veteran along with many other interesting people. I heard an elderly woman vent her concerns about speeding on Holden Avenue and the difficulty of walking across the street even in the crosswalks. I tried several times myself, very few cars let me across. They could use a crosswalk with lights.
I met a woman who helps DCF children reunite with their families and find affordable housing. We agreed that housing is a huge problem for many lower income families. It’s such a big problem that it will require a concerted effort by all of our Attleboro’s civic and political leaders.
I met a policeman who needs to be both a social worker and a counselor in his day to day patrol. I assured him I will be supportive and listen to our police, especially when handling tough situations. As a social worker, I have been assisted by police in Boston and Attleboro throughout my career. He had a John McCain sign on his front yard and we agreed that Senator McCain was a truly great American.
I was invited into the home of an 89 year old World War 2 veteran of the Army Air Force. He shared his Army photos and certificates displayed in his living room. We talked about the need to help the elderly and the importance of the great work our senior center does. This beautiful couple has been married 66 years and were delighted to bring me into their home. It was definitely an honor to be with them.
It feels good to be back in Attleboro.