On the Trail with Ty: 9/20/18

1. The highlight on Wednesday was recovering a lost dog and returning him to his owner. While driving on Thacher Street (5B) we almost ran into the owner. He was beside himself. His dog had been lost for a couple of hours in the South Main St & Thacher area. Five minutes later, while knocking on Tyler St. doors, we spotted Tonka, a huge old dog, meandering around a yard. I managed to lure Tonka towards me, steered him home, and made his owner’s day. That was fun!
2. Next, I met Chris. Chris is dog- tired of commuting to his job in Burlington, Mass. It’s can be a four hour round trip commute! Chris is seriously considering moving closer to his job. We agreed that commuting can be hell on wheels, literally. After venting, Chris offered to take one of my a signs. Sometimes people just need to talk. And I like to listen.
3. Today (Thursday) was spent in the Meadowsweet & Richie Road area (off Oak Hill Ave.) My highlight was meeting Anne, who is a recent cancer survivor. Fortunately she is in remission. We shared our mutual stories. I am also in remission after prostate surgery in December, 2017.  Anne and I really connected in the ten minutes we talked.
When I leave someone’s door, I suggest they phone me (508-577-1412) when they have any concerns. I really mean that.
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Then he said, “I don’t like politicians.”

I met a man who drove home while I was at his front door today. He looked concerned so I went over to his parked car. He didn’t look comfortable while I told him I am running for city council. Then he said, “I don’t like politicians.”

I understood him. Politicians can be threatening to some people, they can appear fake, powerful, slick, manipulative, corrupt, liars, or worse. I found myself saying, “I am not a career politician. I have no ambitions beyond this position. I don’t like many politicians either.” Then he smiled a bit.

I really don’t see myself as a politician. I see myself as a social worker, working for the good of people. I envision weighing each city council vote to see how I can have the most positive effect on our city. I won’t get into a political war with other councilors. To me, getting in a battle is pointless and negative. I will seek ways to do something positive. Each vote will be answering an inner question.

How can I be helpful?

I am not a power-monger. As a councillor, I will be open and accountable to the public and give my reasons for votes. I don’t want anyone guessing why I voted yes or no.

I also believe in term limits so I can’t stay in office too long… maybe six years, eight max. I don’t want to get powerful. The idea of seeking power is repugnant to me. But I do plan to help Attleboro and our citizens. That is why I’m running.

A SIMPLE DAY AT THE DOORS WITH ATTLEBORO’S FINEST

Sunday, July 28 — Volunteer David and I were talking with an Attleboro teacher this afternoon. She was telling us about the cut backs in the school system over the years. David and I were listening to her concerns when I noticed an Attleboro policeman walking up behind us. I had no idea what was going on.

Someone in that neighborhood had called the police to complain that David and I were harassing the neighborhood. We had knocked on four doors and only talked with one other person besides the middle school teacher. The police said that we were soliciting without a license, an offense that carries a hefty fine. The policeman was very professional and we instantly stopped talking with the lady.
Soon three police cars were in the cul-de-sac area. They thought we were pulling a solar energy scheme upon the residents. At least that’s what one of the neighbors thought when they called the police. But fortunately, upon speaking with us, the police soon learned that we were on a political mission. We were told the only people that can freely knock on Attleboro doors without a license are political and church people.
Everyone relaxed when they realized I was running for city council. I told the three policeman that I was glad they were checking for soliticitors running a solar energy scam on the residents. As far as I am concerned, Attleboro’s finest were doing their job of protecting us and doing it well.
I have had several occasions to need help from the police in my sixteen years in Attleboro. Our police have always been very professional and fair in my experience. Jan and I support the Attleboro police at their annual fund raiser every year.
I’m glad I’m not peddling solar energy schemes in Attleboro! I plan to be very supportive of our police if I get to join the City Council in November.

To my friends, supporters, and anyone curious to find out what I am running for:

Two days ago a couple of my friends asked me if i want to run for election on Attleboro’s City Council. It seems that Julie Hall has just resigned the council, effective Sept. 3, 2018.
I SAID YES…. I WANT TO BE ON THE CITY COUNCIL.
Today I called Jim Hand, political reporter for the Attleboro Sun Chronicle, and told him I am running as an at-large candidate for the City Council this November. I have fallen in love with Attleboro since moving here in 2002. I have worked as a social worker at the Attleboro YMCA for the past three years, recently was appointed to the Council on Human rights, and want to help serve you and our city.
I have a chance now to support Mayor Paul Heroux in his quest to improve Attleboro’s schools, revitalize our downtown area, and bring in new businesses. My priorities are;
1. BUILD A FIRST-RATE SCHOOL SYSTEM, PROTECT OUR CHILDREN, AND SUPPORT OUR EXCELLENT LIBRARY.
2. HIRE A DIRECTOR OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT TO REVITALIZE OUR CITY AND DOWNTOWN.
3. SUPPORT OUR EXCELLENT SENIOR CENTER.
4. SUPPORT ATTLEBORO’S POLICE, FIRE FIGHTERS, AND THE REST OF OUR CITY EMPLOYEES.
5. PROVIDE YOU WITH GOOD CONSTITUENT SERVICES.
I want to help the City Council and Mayor Heroux find ways to help our children, seniors, home owners, businesses, and those struggling to survive. Together, let’s join in helping Attleboro thrive!
Please let me know if you want to support my candidacy as a volunteer and/or financial contributor. 
I have been a social worker for over 30 years, serving residents of the Attleboro YMCA and supervised foster care for people with disabilities.