On the Trail with Ty: 9/22/18

It was a good day. I was greeted by lots of folks and put five signs on their lawns. Four of the signs went right along Newport Ave, Route 1A. South Attleboro always seems friendly, regardless of the busy traffic.
John and I were amazed by the beauty along Pitus Ave, surrounded by a peaceful forest. So close — yet so far from the highways.
Two men shared their concerns today, along with the frustrations of keeping their medical insurance. Yesterday, a young man told me about his stroke and seizure disorder. People are struggling with their own issues and need someone to talk to, even a stranger like myself. I referred two of these men to the Larson Senior Center to talk with one of our terrific Social Workers. I’m going to follow up with the Wellness Director at the Attleboro YMCA for the man recovering from a stroke. Perhaps we can help his recovery.
I’m convinced one of the most important skills a City Councilor can have is be a good listener. I try.
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On the Trail with Ty: 9/17/18

1.This is the week my beloved Red Sox will clinch the Eastern Division vs. the Yankees. How fitting that my first experience today in Ward 5A (off South Main St.) was about baseball? As we were inserting a pair of signs at the corner of Mulberry and Lafayette St., a man walked by and told me he enjoyed my book about the 1918 Red Sox. His then 15 year old daughter had given my book to him almost 20 years ago. I signed the book for Steve last year at the Attleboro Community Theatre.
We ended up talking about some of the players of that long ago deadball era. This wasn’t Attleboro politics but it resulted in my putting a sign in Steve’s yard. Great way to start the day.
2. Jose and I met in front of his barn on Pine Street and had a conversation about the Attleboro dump. Jose pays his taxes, which takes care of his weekly trash. Jose feels the dump should remain free. He loves Attleboro. Originally from Portugal, Jose wants his grandchildren to be fluent in both English and his native language. Jose thinks our schools should be teaching several foreign languages at a younger age, instead of simply offering Spanish in High School.
3. Sara on Dunham Street introduced me to Brent, her nine year old son. Brent can hear the teachers better than in the open class he had in fourth grade. He loves doing math. Sarah (Mom) and Brent are delighted he finally has a classroom with real walls.
4. While biking up Park Street towards Sturdy Hospital, I had the good fortune to meet Brenda, who suddenly appeared at her front door. She has a strong feeling for the homeless of our city. Brenda hopes we eventually have a family homeless shelter so struggling families can have a sense of security and warmth. Brenda actually grew up in a shelter on the North Shore of Mass. She wonders if Attleboro residents realize we do have a homeless population. As I left, she mused, “I will suffer for our homeless till the day I die.”
5. While heading back to my car, I stopped my bike in front of a quiet house on Parker Street. I heard a voice from the leafy front steps. It was a middle aged woman bemoaning the fate of her 62 year old sister, who was in the house suffering from Alzheimer’s.  I suggested she speak to one of our social workers at the Larson Senior Center. She sighed again. Her sister wasn’t well and didn’t seem to be trying to help herself. She thanked me for stopping and listening. Wish I could have done more.
6. My last visit was to a past supporter on School Street. This senior lady wants the council and our mayor to get along better. She wants city leaders to be civil and respectful of each other. She wants leadership that does something positive. I was a little surprised when she looked me in the eye, and told me to put up my sign in her yard. Then she asked me to contact Jim Hawkins and put one of his signs up, too. I would be honored to serve her. She’s a tough cookie and a really good soul.
All in all, it was a good day in the heart of Attleboro. Ward 5A is our smallest precinct but a vibrant one.
                                       Keep your chin up.
                                                               Ty

On the Trail with Ty: 9/14/18

A day well spent in the neighborhoods off of Pike Avenue in Ward 4B. One man told me he had a stroke five weeks ago and was found by the fire department’s rescue squad, First Responders. They treated him on site, hustled him to the hospital, and may have saved his life.
Following recovery, he went down to the fire station with dinner for the men who helped him. The firemen were surprised and told him they had only been thanked once in all the time they drove an ambulance to an emergency.
We talked about the importance of thanking city employees whether they be our police, firemen, social workers, librarians, park and recreation, or DPW workers. Everyone who works for the city of Attleboro is deserving of our thanks.

It was humbling to meet this gentlemen.

On the trail with Ty: 9/8/18

This campaign sometimes feels like a battle of signs. We have about 180 signs up. My opponents have lots of signs too.
The last two days have been exceptional with 11 homeowners requesting signs in wards 2 and 3. Each one of those signs represents a wonderful conversation with that homeowner.
Today, along North Main Street, I met a lady, her 18 year old daughter, and her daughters best friend. We talked about the large increase in Attleboro High School classes over the past few years. We talked about the need for a civics class at AHS. We talked about the new voting procedure in the state of Maine. We talked about college and the young women’s goals of becoming a social worker and an engineer. We talked about protesting when our schools lose good teachers through budget cuts. We talked about homeless folks in Attleboro and the need for a family shelter.
Each sign has a story behind it. This North Main Street sign represents a proud mother, a daughter determined to make this a better world, and a friend who wants to be a good engineer. This sign represents two young women that are proud to be voting for the first time, who care about Attleboro’s schools, and who want to make this world a better place.
Each sign tells an important story.

On The Trail with Ty: 9/6/18

Today ended early with a big thunderstorm at 5 pm. I was on Kellcourt Ave. speaking with Joe about his family, neighbors, and friends. He loves his area and really likes Attleboro. Joe moved into his home in 1992 and according to him, it was one of the best decision he’s ever made. Block parties, a friendly neighborhood, and a great place to raise his family. I liked Joe instantly. He signed my nomination papers, asked for a sign, and then the rain hit us.

A few hours earlier, I met a young woman on Commerce Way who simply glowed. Emily is a senior at Bridgewater State College and plans to be an elementary school teacher next fall. She did her student teaching in Attleboro during her junior year and loved it. The only drawback was the size of the classes which really surprised her. Regardless, Emily wants to come back to Attleboro and spend her career teaching in her hometown. When I left her door, her eyes sparkled again, she smiled and declared, “I love Attleboro!”

Lots of positivity in both Joe and Emily. I can’t wait to meet the rest of this city!

Please join us Saturday 9/8 from 10am-12pm as we hold signs downtown. Help us #TyAttleboroTogether!!!

On the Trail with Ty: 8/28/18

I had a phone call from the Attleboro Sun Chronicle yesterday while knocking on doors. A reporter, Jim Hand, asked me about the book I wrote, “The Year The Red Sox Won the Series.” It was the Boston Globe book of the year back in 1999, telling the story of the world champion 1918 Boston Red Sox. Babe Ruth starred on that team, winning two games against the Chicago Cubs as a pitcher in the 1918 World Series.

I am flattered that the paper wants to run a story, replete with old photos, of my only published book, in this 100th anniversary of those 1918 champion Red Sox. It will be featured in a Saturday Sun Chronicle paper, probably on September 1 or 8.

Baseball has been a big part of my life. My dad was a professional baseball player, I played on a little league team, high school team, and American Legion ball as an outfielder. Baseball has been one of the driving forces of my life, including many years as a Red Sox and Paw Sox fan. I don’t talk about sports on my election journey through Attleboro. However, I do believe school sports can shape a young person’s life. Coaches become role models who make a strong imprint upon a youth.  Winning is nice but isn’t the most important thing. Developing the character of our youth should be number one in Attleboro’s sports programs.

I am heading out on my bike to Ward 3B Tuesday afternoon. Maybe playing ball through my teenage summers fortified me for a hot day like this. I learned to play under extreme mid-summer heat and maintain my concentration on each pitch. Or maybe I just love Attleboro and the people within it so much that I’m able to persevere through the heat and humidity. You decide.

51HFGJWRMVL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_The Year The Red Sox Won The Series: A Chronicle of the 1918 Championship Season
by Ty Waterman & Mel Springer
Link: http://a.co/d/gYorJ9p

It feels good to be back in Attleboro

Jan and I had a wonderfully relaxing vacation camping near the ocean in the Acadia region of Maine. After 8 days to recharge our batteries, I went out today along Holden and North Main Streets in Ward 3B.
I met a lawyer, policeman, construction foreman and a retired World War 2 veteran along with many other interesting people. I heard an elderly woman vent her concerns about speeding on Holden Avenue and the difficulty of walking across the street even in the crosswalks. I tried several times myself, very few cars let me across. They could use a crosswalk with lights.
I met a woman who helps DCF children reunite with their families and find affordable housing. We agreed that housing is a huge problem for many lower income families. It’s such a big problem that it will require a concerted effort by all of our Attleboro’s civic and political leaders.
I met a policeman who needs to be both a social worker and a counselor in his day to day patrol. I assured him I will be supportive and listen to our police, especially when handling tough situations. As a social worker, I have been assisted by police in Boston and Attleboro throughout my career. He had a John McCain sign on his front yard and we agreed that Senator McCain was a truly great American.
I was invited into the home of an 89 year old World War 2 veteran of the Army Air Force. He shared his Army photos and certificates displayed in his living room. We talked about the need to help the elderly and the importance of the great work our senior center does. This beautiful couple has been married 66 years and were delighted to bring me into their home. It was definitely an honor to be with them.
It feels good to be back in Attleboro.